Recovery of cremation remains from bodies of water

One theme of a previous post on cremation remains was that these remains are not difficult to find and identify in large quantity. This implies that the major excuse made for the paucity of physical evidence presented after the war to substantiate the extermination site thesis, namely that all the physical evidence was destroyed in the cremations, is nonsense, as fire never reduces bodies to ash in the precise sense of the term. It also implies that the excuse offered by HDOT, Roberto Muehlenkamp, and their ilk, namely that the cremation remains were just too hard to find, is monumentally silly. When you have examples of a few investigators armed with nothing more than a trowel recovering hundreds of bone fragments from a single outdoor cremation, you can only laugh at the idea that the Soviets would have been unable to locate and collect the cremation remains.

At some of the camps, however, a different excuse is sometimes in play, namely that the cremation remains were thrown in some body of water. Although such a pattern of disposal would complicate the recovery of the cremation remains, it would not prevent it. The recovery of submerged cremation remains is discussed in chapter 4.2.4 of the book Forensic Cremation: recovery and analysis, which includes the following photos from a case in Ontario in which cremation remains were thrown in a river:

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It’s telling that the holocaust industry, despite being obscenely well funded, has not sent divers to search the river bottoms near the alleged extermination camps for huge quantities of cremation remains.

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